Global Telecom Goes Virtual With Vyatta

January 18, 2010 at 10:20 pm 2 comments

“The obvious is that which is never seen until someone expresses it simply.”
– Khalil Gibran
____________

2010 will mark the year network virtualization took off in a big way, and the largest use case in the world will be based on Vyatta:  Tens of thousands of virtual machines powering a telecom-class network offering.

We can’t mention yet who the telecom is, since the offering is theirs to launch.  But it’s one of the biggest in the world, with the technical foresight to realize that tremendous strategic advantage was theirs for the taking if they embraced the flexibility that open networking software allows.  In the coming months the world will see an ingenious offering that is simply not possible using closed, proprietary systems.

Two technology breakthroughs made it possible:
1.  A highly-capable open networking OS (Vyatta).
2.  Virtual machines for networking applications (Vyatta and others).

Recently the telecom and Vyatta briefed some key industry analysts under NDA.  What was fascinating is their reactions.  Joe Skorupa from Gartner said, “Service providers that are able to leverage advances in virtualization and networking are in a unique position to bring to market the next-generation of premises-based equipment and services for Enterprise branch offices. This technology will simplify the management and deployment of edge devices and services and fundamentally alter the economics of managed service delivery,” Others had similar reactions.  Think of what this portends:  Analysts are acknowledging the clear existence of a powerful trend that is close to breaking free.  All the world needs is to see one huge use case, and realize how powerful this technology strategy is in terms of driving business differentiation and efficiency.  The shock wave that’s about to be set off — driven by virtualization — will affect the networking industry with the same kind of impact with which it hit the computing industry.

Think of it:  Networking racks previously full of different devices now shrinking down to a single server with CPU power to spare. What’s the savings in CapEx and OpEx you can gain from eliminating entire classes of devices?  Space and power savings?

Imagine every branch office in your company being served by the same software template of VMs.  The only difference between offices is how big of a server is needed based on usage.  Put a 4-core server in the Dubuque office and an 8-core server in the Seattle office.  Both offices run the exact same networking software.

And think about cloud and datacenters… multi-tiered application structures requiring networking and security between them all.  Spin up a Vyatta VM here to route the traffic between apps on different servers, a VM there to firewall off the HR database, yet another as the VPN concentrator for everyone’s remote access.  Consider the sheer economic benefits of being able to snapshot a software template from one datacenter and clone it at another another for disaster recovery… without moving around or duplicating specialized hardware devices.

Vyatta is already used virtualized in branch offices, datacenters, and both public and private clouds.  The early adopters are gaining the advantage, and 2010 will be their showcase year. So perhaps you’ll pardon me while I boogaloo… but this is getting FUN 😉

See press release >>

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